Saturday, March 22, 2014

Hi!
As I look out the back door today, I can still see the last little remains from the more than 75 inches of snow that was present in my back yard over the course of winter. The once tall and towering mounds of snow on either side of my driveway are but mere little plops of snowy-looking ice. Winter is giving way (though, not without a fight) slowly to spring, and all the snow melt has left my yard a bit squishy.

The hope of Spring and anticipation of Spring break made me think that I needed to finalize my Summer activity calendars. I know, you're thinking, "Summer?! I just need to get through 3rd quarter IEP updates!" or "I have so many referrals and evaluations to get through!" I'm right there with ya. Which is why I want to be sure to get this out there now so it doesn't get put on the back burner and forgotten.



I actually created all new activities from scratch rather than recycling previous calendars' activities. I will eventually re-use those older calendars again, but I like things to feel fresh for my students, so rotating my calendars seems to do the trick. That way, they aren't just doing the "same old, same old" each summer.

There are two versions of my calendars: English and Spanish! If your caseload is similar to mine, you may have quite a few bilingual students that would benefit from having summer activities in Spanish.

Anyway, I thought some of you might like to use them as well, so below here to get your freebies!
2014 Speech-Language Summer Activity Calendars - English
2014 Speech-Language Summer Activity Calendars - Spanish

Also available through the link on Speechie Freebies on the Friday FreeBEES link-up! Check over there for other awesome freebies :-)
http://www.speechiefreebies.com/2014/03/friday-freebees-late-but-still-great.html


Do you provide summer activities for your students? If so, comment below with ideas that you have done in the past. Sharing ideas is great :-)

Thanks for checking out my blog! Be sure to subscribe to keep in touch.
Keep it AFV!
Saturday, March 22, 2014 Karen
Hi!
As I look out the back door today, I can still see the last little remains from the more than 75 inches of snow that was present in my back yard over the course of winter. The once tall and towering mounds of snow on either side of my driveway are but mere little plops of snowy-looking ice. Winter is giving way (though, not without a fight) slowly to spring, and all the snow melt has left my yard a bit squishy.

The hope of Spring and anticipation of Spring break made me think that I needed to finalize my Summer activity calendars. I know, you're thinking, "Summer?! I just need to get through 3rd quarter IEP updates!" or "I have so many referrals and evaluations to get through!" I'm right there with ya. Which is why I want to be sure to get this out there now so it doesn't get put on the back burner and forgotten.



I actually created all new activities from scratch rather than recycling previous calendars' activities. I will eventually re-use those older calendars again, but I like things to feel fresh for my students, so rotating my calendars seems to do the trick. That way, they aren't just doing the "same old, same old" each summer.

There are two versions of my calendars: English and Spanish! If your caseload is similar to mine, you may have quite a few bilingual students that would benefit from having summer activities in Spanish.

Anyway, I thought some of you might like to use them as well, so below here to get your freebies!
2014 Speech-Language Summer Activity Calendars - English
2014 Speech-Language Summer Activity Calendars - Spanish

Also available through the link on Speechie Freebies on the Friday FreeBEES link-up! Check over there for other awesome freebies :-)
http://www.speechiefreebies.com/2014/03/friday-freebees-late-but-still-great.html


Do you provide summer activities for your students? If so, comment below with ideas that you have done in the past. Sharing ideas is great :-)

Thanks for checking out my blog! Be sure to subscribe to keep in touch.
Keep it AFV!

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Hi!

I'm here with another freebie for you today. Recently, my school district has been talking about the Danielson Framework for Teaching as it pertains to teacher evaluations. If you have also been hearing about this particular teacher evaluation tool, keep reading!


I've put together an evaluation planner to collect my thoughts for a future evaluation, keeping these components in mind. My school district has not adopted the Danielson framework at this point, but our evaluation rubric is pretty similar. This organizer is created based on the Danielson Framework for teaching, which I should note, was not created by me. I simply put it into a form that I intend to use to collect my evidence and thoughts.

You can utilize this resource to help you plan for your future evaluations. It is a simple organizer in which you can gather evidence of effective teaching practices in each of the four domains.


Simply write a note or other indicator describing your evidence. You may want to tuck any physical artifacts (pictures, print-outs, etc.) that you have behind each domain so that it is handy.

I hope this will be of help to you!
Click here to get your freebie!
Share this link with your colleagues... because best of all, it's free!

Thanks for checking out my blog. Be sure to follow this blog to keep in touch.
Keep it AFV!
Karen
Thursday, March 20, 2014 Karen
Hi!

I'm here with another freebie for you today. Recently, my school district has been talking about the Danielson Framework for Teaching as it pertains to teacher evaluations. If you have also been hearing about this particular teacher evaluation tool, keep reading!


I've put together an evaluation planner to collect my thoughts for a future evaluation, keeping these components in mind. My school district has not adopted the Danielson framework at this point, but our evaluation rubric is pretty similar. This organizer is created based on the Danielson Framework for teaching, which I should note, was not created by me. I simply put it into a form that I intend to use to collect my evidence and thoughts.

You can utilize this resource to help you plan for your future evaluations. It is a simple organizer in which you can gather evidence of effective teaching practices in each of the four domains.


Simply write a note or other indicator describing your evidence. You may want to tuck any physical artifacts (pictures, print-outs, etc.) that you have behind each domain so that it is handy.

I hope this will be of help to you!
Click here to get your freebie!
Share this link with your colleagues... because best of all, it's free!

Thanks for checking out my blog. Be sure to follow this blog to keep in touch.
Keep it AFV!
Karen

Saturday, March 1, 2014

Hi, there!

In a previous post, I mentioned that I had just gotten myself a set of Rory's Story Cubes.

If you're not familiar with them, the basic idea is that you roll the 9 dice, and connect them all in some way to tell a story. You don't have to use them in a certain order, just what makes sense to you in your story. Additionally, some of the cubes are a little unclear as to what they should be... make it whatever is useful! An example is the last cube in my picture below... the letter L in a square. I don't know what that's supposed to be, so I just chose an L word.

Since I bought my set, I have found quite a bit on other internet sites and blogs about them! I especially have enjoyed finding the graphic organizers that utilize these dice. And... I have an organizer to share with you now as well!

This organizer came from the idea that several teachers at my school shared during a meeting after school. They were sharing that students could tell a story with the framework of "Somebody wanted, so, but, then," which hits at the 5 elements of a story: character, setting, plot, conflict, and resolution. They filled in the story plot with Little Red Riding Hood as an example, and that sold it for me. I knew I could easily use the framework with my students. However, the scrap of paper I wrote it down on got lost in the shuffle, and I hadn't thought much about it until I got my story cubes, and had found other people's graphic organizers. So I decided to make the framework into a graphic organizer so I (and all of you, too) would actually be able use it with some regularity. I added the "finally" to accommodate the 9 dice in the set.

So, I tested out my graphic organizer at home. I rolled my 9 story cubes and this is what I got.


The story could go something like this:

{Dice 1} Sam woke up from a nap one morning
{Dice 2) and realized he wanted to check his math homework to make sure it was correct.
{Dice 3} So he looked in the book to see if there was
{Dice 4} an answer key.
{Dice 5} But just as he was checking the first one, ninjas parachuted out of the sky
{Dice 6} from all over the world.
{Dice 7} Then they said they were looking for
{Dice 8} justice. They came running towards Sam!
{Dice 9} Finally, Sam leapt out of the way to safety and was able to finish his homework.

OK, so obviously, I'm not going to win any literary prizes, but you get the gist. I have a few students on my caseload who I have found to tell narratives that don't go anywhere. They sort of just repeat the first thing they said  and flounder around until it feels like it has been long enough of a story. I have gotten them to retell 2-picture sequence stories, and have been working on them telling their own, and now we're working on 3-4 picture sequences. When they're ready to make the jump to longer stories, I'll have this ready to go!

And now, as is my M.O... some speechy things you can do with these cubes!

Articulation: GREAT for carryover of speech sounds. No matter what sound your student is working on, it's going to come up in the story.
Language: Expanding the length of stories and using more complex syntax is a natural fit. After more simplistic stories (first, next, last), students can begin using some transition words to keep the flow of the story going. Also great for regular/irregular past verb tenses, since many stories are told in the past tense.
Auditory processing: Have a peer listen for details and ask wh- questions about the story that another student told. Examples from my story: "What did Sam need to do?" "Who parachuted down from the sky?" "Where was Sam going to look for answers to math problems?"
Stuttering: Using fluency skills, tell the story. You can start at the 1-sentence level and discuss ways to move through repetitions/blocks/prolongations, and do one dice at a time. If the student is able to produce longer amounts of speech, you can chunk it any way you need to.

CCSS alignment suggestions (not exhaustive):
L.K.1, L.1.1, L.2.1, L.3.1, L.4.1, L.5.1
SL.K.4, SL.K.6, SL.1.4, SL.1.6, SL.2.4, SL.2.6, SL.3.4, SL.3.6, SL.4.4

So, without further ado, click here to grab your FREEBIE!
How do you use picture dice with your students? Comment below and share your ideas.

Thanks for checking out my blog! Be sure to follow this blog to keep in touch.

Keep it AFV!
Karen
Saturday, March 01, 2014 Karen
Hi, there!

In a previous post, I mentioned that I had just gotten myself a set of Rory's Story Cubes.

If you're not familiar with them, the basic idea is that you roll the 9 dice, and connect them all in some way to tell a story. You don't have to use them in a certain order, just what makes sense to you in your story. Additionally, some of the cubes are a little unclear as to what they should be... make it whatever is useful! An example is the last cube in my picture below... the letter L in a square. I don't know what that's supposed to be, so I just chose an L word.

Since I bought my set, I have found quite a bit on other internet sites and blogs about them! I especially have enjoyed finding the graphic organizers that utilize these dice. And... I have an organizer to share with you now as well!

This organizer came from the idea that several teachers at my school shared during a meeting after school. They were sharing that students could tell a story with the framework of "Somebody wanted, so, but, then," which hits at the 5 elements of a story: character, setting, plot, conflict, and resolution. They filled in the story plot with Little Red Riding Hood as an example, and that sold it for me. I knew I could easily use the framework with my students. However, the scrap of paper I wrote it down on got lost in the shuffle, and I hadn't thought much about it until I got my story cubes, and had found other people's graphic organizers. So I decided to make the framework into a graphic organizer so I (and all of you, too) would actually be able use it with some regularity. I added the "finally" to accommodate the 9 dice in the set.

So, I tested out my graphic organizer at home. I rolled my 9 story cubes and this is what I got.


The story could go something like this:

{Dice 1} Sam woke up from a nap one morning
{Dice 2) and realized he wanted to check his math homework to make sure it was correct.
{Dice 3} So he looked in the book to see if there was
{Dice 4} an answer key.
{Dice 5} But just as he was checking the first one, ninjas parachuted out of the sky
{Dice 6} from all over the world.
{Dice 7} Then they said they were looking for
{Dice 8} justice. They came running towards Sam!
{Dice 9} Finally, Sam leapt out of the way to safety and was able to finish his homework.

OK, so obviously, I'm not going to win any literary prizes, but you get the gist. I have a few students on my caseload who I have found to tell narratives that don't go anywhere. They sort of just repeat the first thing they said  and flounder around until it feels like it has been long enough of a story. I have gotten them to retell 2-picture sequence stories, and have been working on them telling their own, and now we're working on 3-4 picture sequences. When they're ready to make the jump to longer stories, I'll have this ready to go!

And now, as is my M.O... some speechy things you can do with these cubes!

Articulation: GREAT for carryover of speech sounds. No matter what sound your student is working on, it's going to come up in the story.
Language: Expanding the length of stories and using more complex syntax is a natural fit. After more simplistic stories (first, next, last), students can begin using some transition words to keep the flow of the story going. Also great for regular/irregular past verb tenses, since many stories are told in the past tense.
Auditory processing: Have a peer listen for details and ask wh- questions about the story that another student told. Examples from my story: "What did Sam need to do?" "Who parachuted down from the sky?" "Where was Sam going to look for answers to math problems?"
Stuttering: Using fluency skills, tell the story. You can start at the 1-sentence level and discuss ways to move through repetitions/blocks/prolongations, and do one dice at a time. If the student is able to produce longer amounts of speech, you can chunk it any way you need to.

CCSS alignment suggestions (not exhaustive):
L.K.1, L.1.1, L.2.1, L.3.1, L.4.1, L.5.1
SL.K.4, SL.K.6, SL.1.4, SL.1.6, SL.2.4, SL.2.6, SL.3.4, SL.3.6, SL.4.4

So, without further ado, click here to grab your FREEBIE!
How do you use picture dice with your students? Comment below and share your ideas.

Thanks for checking out my blog! Be sure to follow this blog to keep in touch.

Keep it AFV!
Karen

Saturday, February 15, 2014

Hi, readers! If you live somewhere in the midwest like I do, you're probably sick of winter. My district has had 4 cancelled school days (which we have to make up) due to snow and/or extreme cold temperatures. About a week ago I heard this area has gotten over 50" of snow this season with more projected in this weekend's forecast. Last year's snow total around this time of the season was 5". Super.

I keep wanting to post things for you, so here I am. I hope you forgive my sparse posting. I can't believe how crazy things can get sometimes, and there are days I just don't want to look at a computer screen anymore.

Anyway, I just had to share my cute Valentine's activity that I used this past week at school.
It's a freebie on TPT from Pink Cat Studio. Since Valentine's Day has passed for this year, you gotta pin this post for next year!

The actual game play is simple. Click on the slingshot and the animal is flung up and pops a bubble. It safely parachutes down and awaits the next turn. When each animal pops all 5 bubbles, the slingshot disappears and the animal is out of play ('cause it finished!). GET YOUR FREEBIE HERE.

My rules involved dice. I used one of my dice from a set of Phase 10 dice.

Each time a student got to roll, the number on the dice corresponded to an animal. I used the 1-4 dice, which has 2 wild spaces. I covered one with a number 5.
1 = rabbit
2 = frog
3 = owl
4 = bee
5 = cat
W = wild. your choice.
We predicted which animal might win, which was a nice change of pace from the students arguing over who won all the time.

But you could make up your own rules, or even use the rules that are included in the game slides. Those rules seem good for push-in, whole-class activities where you can divide up into teams.

And here are some speechy things you can do while playing:

Articulation: take a turn after practicing a targeted word/phrase/sentence. Of course, this game lends itself to the following words that students may be able to practice their sounds with: rabbit, frog, owl, bee, cat, slingshot, parachute.
Language: Vocabulary words (similar to those above for artic), describing: EET each animal, if you don't know what the EET is, visit this link to learn more), telling stories/narratives: include each animal in the story and sling each one up as they are included.
Auditory processing: This game is perfectly laid out for temporal directions and spatial directions. Take turns giving directions like, "before you click the owl, click the bee," or click the animal that is to the left of the owl." You can add additional elements to increase complexity as needed.
Stuttering: Using fluency strategies, explain the rules of the game to a peer. Or talk about the animal that is the student's favorite. Or make up a story with each character and as each character speaks or is featured, shoot them up at the bubbles.

In other realms of my life, I just attended my state conference and really enjoyed the time to learn more. I attended several vocabulary sessions and a couple auditory processing sessions. I feel like my understanding of auditory processing is just opening up! I'm so excited to learn more about this area to help some of my students.

And Christmas came again in February! I used some gift cards that I was given over Christmas this weekend to buy some things I have been needing/had my eye on. Including: Rory's story cubes! I'm excited to learn more about how you all use these with your students, so, share in the comments, please :-)

Thanks for checking out my blog. Be sure to follow this blog to keep in touch.

Keep it AFV!
Karen
Saturday, February 15, 2014 Karen
Hi, readers! If you live somewhere in the midwest like I do, you're probably sick of winter. My district has had 4 cancelled school days (which we have to make up) due to snow and/or extreme cold temperatures. About a week ago I heard this area has gotten over 50" of snow this season with more projected in this weekend's forecast. Last year's snow total around this time of the season was 5". Super.

I keep wanting to post things for you, so here I am. I hope you forgive my sparse posting. I can't believe how crazy things can get sometimes, and there are days I just don't want to look at a computer screen anymore.

Anyway, I just had to share my cute Valentine's activity that I used this past week at school.
It's a freebie on TPT from Pink Cat Studio. Since Valentine's Day has passed for this year, you gotta pin this post for next year!

The actual game play is simple. Click on the slingshot and the animal is flung up and pops a bubble. It safely parachutes down and awaits the next turn. When each animal pops all 5 bubbles, the slingshot disappears and the animal is out of play ('cause it finished!). GET YOUR FREEBIE HERE.

My rules involved dice. I used one of my dice from a set of Phase 10 dice.

Each time a student got to roll, the number on the dice corresponded to an animal. I used the 1-4 dice, which has 2 wild spaces. I covered one with a number 5.
1 = rabbit
2 = frog
3 = owl
4 = bee
5 = cat
W = wild. your choice.
We predicted which animal might win, which was a nice change of pace from the students arguing over who won all the time.

But you could make up your own rules, or even use the rules that are included in the game slides. Those rules seem good for push-in, whole-class activities where you can divide up into teams.

And here are some speechy things you can do while playing:

Articulation: take a turn after practicing a targeted word/phrase/sentence. Of course, this game lends itself to the following words that students may be able to practice their sounds with: rabbit, frog, owl, bee, cat, slingshot, parachute.
Language: Vocabulary words (similar to those above for artic), describing: EET each animal, if you don't know what the EET is, visit this link to learn more), telling stories/narratives: include each animal in the story and sling each one up as they are included.
Auditory processing: This game is perfectly laid out for temporal directions and spatial directions. Take turns giving directions like, "before you click the owl, click the bee," or click the animal that is to the left of the owl." You can add additional elements to increase complexity as needed.
Stuttering: Using fluency strategies, explain the rules of the game to a peer. Or talk about the animal that is the student's favorite. Or make up a story with each character and as each character speaks or is featured, shoot them up at the bubbles.

In other realms of my life, I just attended my state conference and really enjoyed the time to learn more. I attended several vocabulary sessions and a couple auditory processing sessions. I feel like my understanding of auditory processing is just opening up! I'm so excited to learn more about this area to help some of my students.

And Christmas came again in February! I used some gift cards that I was given over Christmas this weekend to buy some things I have been needing/had my eye on. Including: Rory's story cubes! I'm excited to learn more about how you all use these with your students, so, share in the comments, please :-)

Thanks for checking out my blog. Be sure to follow this blog to keep in touch.

Keep it AFV!
Karen

Sunday, December 22, 2013

Hello, readers!

I am delighted to be on winter break from school. It was a long road to get here, but I'm trying to get caught up on everything, including posting on my blog!

Anyway, I was recently perusing pinterest and was inspired by one of the activities. The original blog post (here) that I saw on pinterest was for a math activity; however, I thought it would work marvelously well for other activities besides math. It could really be used for anything!  

It is an open ended activity to make hot cocoa mugs. 

Directions: have students decorate their mug with words or sentences and add cotton ball “marshmallows” on top.

Here are some ideas to get you started:
Articulation: put a “marshmallow” on for every target word/sentence practiced.
Language: synonyms and antonyms: write a pair of words on the mugs. Use each word in a sentence and add “marshmallows” for correct sentences.
Auditory processing: Target listening comprehension with a short story about making hot cocoa. Ask wh- questions (Who made it? What were the ingredients? When did they drink it? Where did they get it?, etc.)
Stuttering: Using fluency skills, discuss how to make hot cocoa, different flavors that can be added, and the pros and cons of adding marshmallows!


I'm really wanting a real cup of hot cocoa now, how about you?

What other ideas do you have?
Thanks for checking out my blog. Be sure to follow this blog to keep in touch.

Keep it AFV!
Karen

Sunday, December 22, 2013 Karen
Hello, readers!

I am delighted to be on winter break from school. It was a long road to get here, but I'm trying to get caught up on everything, including posting on my blog!

Anyway, I was recently perusing pinterest and was inspired by one of the activities. The original blog post (here) that I saw on pinterest was for a math activity; however, I thought it would work marvelously well for other activities besides math. It could really be used for anything!  

It is an open ended activity to make hot cocoa mugs. 

Directions: have students decorate their mug with words or sentences and add cotton ball “marshmallows” on top.

Here are some ideas to get you started:
Articulation: put a “marshmallow” on for every target word/sentence practiced.
Language: synonyms and antonyms: write a pair of words on the mugs. Use each word in a sentence and add “marshmallows” for correct sentences.
Auditory processing: Target listening comprehension with a short story about making hot cocoa. Ask wh- questions (Who made it? What were the ingredients? When did they drink it? Where did they get it?, etc.)
Stuttering: Using fluency skills, discuss how to make hot cocoa, different flavors that can be added, and the pros and cons of adding marshmallows!


I'm really wanting a real cup of hot cocoa now, how about you?

What other ideas do you have?
Thanks for checking out my blog. Be sure to follow this blog to keep in touch.

Keep it AFV!
Karen