Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Hi!
I'm back today with an app review of the Articulation Test Center by Little Bee Speech. I'm excited, because this is the first assessment app I'm using.

Disclaimer: This app was provided to me gratis for the purposes of this review. I was not compensated in any additional ways. The opinions in this review are my own, and were not influenced by the app developer, or anyone else.

First things first... there are video tutorials available that provide an intro to this app. I highly suggest watching them if you decide to get this app.
Full Test Tutorial (also embedded into the app itself)
Quick Test Tutorial (also embedded into the app itself)
App Update Info for v. 1.3

I am using an adapted rubric to help me complete this app review. I hope you will find it helpful and objective. The scale is from 1-4; 1 being a low rating, 4 being a high rating. This is a fairly thorough review. I sincerely hope that you aren't deterred by the number of comments I made. I really want you to realize all the aspects of this app to help you decide if this is right for you.

Relevance rating 4/4
For this rating, I considered whether the app's focus has a strong connection to the purpose for the app and appropriate to meet that need.

This app is designed with SLPs in mind. The full test was designed for SLPs to "assess articulation and phonology skills in students of all ages." The screener was designed for "parents, teachers, and SLPs to quickly screen students' articulation skills," based on age. While incredibly relevant to do what it claims, I personally do not know if teachers and parents that I have come into contact with would actually purchase this app. They certainly can, if they wish; it's a great app. However, they would only be able to utilize the screener portion, and the cost of the app may deter those individuals from getting the most out of this app.

Customization rating 4/4
For this rating, I considered whether the app offers complete flexibility to alter content and settings to meet individual needs.

This app is super customizable. The full test has options to give the full test, or just a selection of sounds.


I have had many referrals for students who have just one sound in error, and the traditional articulation test I have includes all sounds in all positions for all students. From the screening, I know that all I need to look is the one sound. However, standardization rules dictate that the test must be administered as described. The Articulation Test Center allows for flexibility. The screener allows you to select the age of the student

You can also customize the settings to include/exclude the voice prompt (when tapped, the app could give a verbal prompt), picture, word, and more. As students get older, you can make the app more age-appropriate by just showing the printed word. However, if you do this, make sure their reading skills are appropriate! You wouldn't want a reading miscue to taint your articulation scores.


You also can create student profiles and save data for later reference, more on that below. Just be sure you're abiding by HIPAA and FERPA rules.

Usability rating 3/4
For this rating, I considered whether the app can be launched and used easily for the intended purpose.

This app is quite user friendly. In both the screener and the full test, you can record (and stop) the student's production with a quick tap of the record button. You can mark a sound as incorrect  (red), an approximation (yellow), or simply leave it as correct (green).


Or you can use the menu to put in the substitution. If the student omitted a sound, you just swipe it up and away! The menus allow you to enter the sound substitutions, and also name the phonological process if one is appropriate.

For non-SLPs who may be using this, the sounds are marked using typical orthography. "Ch" like in "cheese" is notated as "ch." Non-SLPs will no doubt appreciate the examples of phonological processes when in that menu; however, should not be expected to fully understand nor make judgments regarding a student's use of them. For SLPs, the IPA character is written underneath the orthographic representation, very tiny, and the font color is teal on teal. I downgraded my rating slightly in this area for the reason that I wish the IPA was more readable, especially on the vowels. If I had my way, the IPA symbols would be more prominent, and the orthographic representations would be underneath instead. But that's from my SLP perspective.


The app also has a button to reverse the stimulus picture so it is facing the student across from you. The rest of the app functions normally, orientated toward you. This makes it easier to arrange who can sit in what chairs for the comfort and ease of both the student and the SLP.


One other thing I wasn't entirely fond of is the fact that some sounds in the words are greyed out. The usability is hindered by this. For example, I was going though the full test as if I was testing a student who uses multiple phonological processes, one of which was final consonant deletion. I can't swipe away the /t/ in elephant easily and mark it with the process. I could tap over in the lower corner and make a note; however it's not an easy, at-a-glance read when you review the results. You need to tap the note icon to see it. Similarly, if a student has syllable deletion or backing, I can't mark that either, depending on the word (e.g., the /t/ in "tire" is greyed out, I wouldn't be able to mark a /k/ for a student who backs alveloars. When I've used my traditional, standardized articulation test, I have made notes for myself on the response sheet with data such as that. Even though that sound isn't being counted for points, it is information I can gather about the student's skills.


From a student's perspective, it may begin to feel awkward when the SLP is tapping away marking all of these things. The ease of hiding your marks behind the stimulus easel is gone, and the student will be able to see green squares turning red or yellow, or to red slash marks. If you have a student who may be sensitive to that, you may just want to use the record button while the student is present, fly through the pictures, and mark the errors after the student has left.

The speech sample includes a lot of things within the scene, and several scenes are available. I recommend turning off the background sounds, because if your student is quiet, or has some subtle errors, it may be difficult to hear him or her.

Feedback rating 4/4
For this rating, I considered whether the app provides specific feedback to the user.

The feedback this app gives you is up to you. If you marked it, it will be visible in a scrolling list of words tested. The app also lets you view errors you marked by sounds, substitutions, and phonological processes. It gives a report that you can use as part of a more comprehensive report, or as a standalone report. It also provides recommendations. But don't forget to use your clinical judgment! The app can only take you so far. You need to ensure that the information which is generated is an accurate description of the student being assessed.


I think the ease of obtaining an intelligibility rating is awesome! You can playback the spontaneous sample and use the + and - buttons to indicate if the student was intelligible or not. When the sample is over, you have a percentage!


Sharing rating 4/4
For this rating, I considered whether the app can collect and save data, and if it can be exported.

The Articulation Test Center app allows you to print or email, provided you have those abilities from your tablet. I do not have a printer I can use from my iPad mini, but emailing would work. It also saves in the app, so you can review it again later, or edit it if there are any errors or things you forgot. The scores are always available from the home screen in the bottom corner.

Overview:
Relevance rating 4/4
Customization rating 4/4
Usability rating 3/4
Feedback rating 4/4
Sharing rating 4/4
Overall: 19/20 (95%)

If you think this app is just what you need, (which it just might be) it can be yours for $49.99. BUT WAIT! Little Bee Speech is throwing a back to school sale! From August 12-14, 2014, it will be 30% off. This will be the biggest sale of the year, so check it out now!


What do you think? Have you used technology when assessing articulation? If not, did this review help you get a feel for what it would be like? Leave a comment below to share your thoughts.
Thanks for checking out my blog. Be sure to follow this blog to stay in touch.

Keep it AFV!
Karen

Tuesday, August 12, 2014 Karen
Hi!
I'm back today with an app review of the Articulation Test Center by Little Bee Speech. I'm excited, because this is the first assessment app I'm using.

Disclaimer: This app was provided to me gratis for the purposes of this review. I was not compensated in any additional ways. The opinions in this review are my own, and were not influenced by the app developer, or anyone else.

First things first... there are video tutorials available that provide an intro to this app. I highly suggest watching them if you decide to get this app.
Full Test Tutorial (also embedded into the app itself)
Quick Test Tutorial (also embedded into the app itself)
App Update Info for v. 1.3

I am using an adapted rubric to help me complete this app review. I hope you will find it helpful and objective. The scale is from 1-4; 1 being a low rating, 4 being a high rating. This is a fairly thorough review. I sincerely hope that you aren't deterred by the number of comments I made. I really want you to realize all the aspects of this app to help you decide if this is right for you.

Relevance rating 4/4
For this rating, I considered whether the app's focus has a strong connection to the purpose for the app and appropriate to meet that need.

This app is designed with SLPs in mind. The full test was designed for SLPs to "assess articulation and phonology skills in students of all ages." The screener was designed for "parents, teachers, and SLPs to quickly screen students' articulation skills," based on age. While incredibly relevant to do what it claims, I personally do not know if teachers and parents that I have come into contact with would actually purchase this app. They certainly can, if they wish; it's a great app. However, they would only be able to utilize the screener portion, and the cost of the app may deter those individuals from getting the most out of this app.

Customization rating 4/4
For this rating, I considered whether the app offers complete flexibility to alter content and settings to meet individual needs.

This app is super customizable. The full test has options to give the full test, or just a selection of sounds.


I have had many referrals for students who have just one sound in error, and the traditional articulation test I have includes all sounds in all positions for all students. From the screening, I know that all I need to look is the one sound. However, standardization rules dictate that the test must be administered as described. The Articulation Test Center allows for flexibility. The screener allows you to select the age of the student

You can also customize the settings to include/exclude the voice prompt (when tapped, the app could give a verbal prompt), picture, word, and more. As students get older, you can make the app more age-appropriate by just showing the printed word. However, if you do this, make sure their reading skills are appropriate! You wouldn't want a reading miscue to taint your articulation scores.


You also can create student profiles and save data for later reference, more on that below. Just be sure you're abiding by HIPAA and FERPA rules.

Usability rating 3/4
For this rating, I considered whether the app can be launched and used easily for the intended purpose.

This app is quite user friendly. In both the screener and the full test, you can record (and stop) the student's production with a quick tap of the record button. You can mark a sound as incorrect  (red), an approximation (yellow), or simply leave it as correct (green).


Or you can use the menu to put in the substitution. If the student omitted a sound, you just swipe it up and away! The menus allow you to enter the sound substitutions, and also name the phonological process if one is appropriate.

For non-SLPs who may be using this, the sounds are marked using typical orthography. "Ch" like in "cheese" is notated as "ch." Non-SLPs will no doubt appreciate the examples of phonological processes when in that menu; however, should not be expected to fully understand nor make judgments regarding a student's use of them. For SLPs, the IPA character is written underneath the orthographic representation, very tiny, and the font color is teal on teal. I downgraded my rating slightly in this area for the reason that I wish the IPA was more readable, especially on the vowels. If I had my way, the IPA symbols would be more prominent, and the orthographic representations would be underneath instead. But that's from my SLP perspective.


The app also has a button to reverse the stimulus picture so it is facing the student across from you. The rest of the app functions normally, orientated toward you. This makes it easier to arrange who can sit in what chairs for the comfort and ease of both the student and the SLP.


One other thing I wasn't entirely fond of is the fact that some sounds in the words are greyed out. The usability is hindered by this. For example, I was going though the full test as if I was testing a student who uses multiple phonological processes, one of which was final consonant deletion. I can't swipe away the /t/ in elephant easily and mark it with the process. I could tap over in the lower corner and make a note; however it's not an easy, at-a-glance read when you review the results. You need to tap the note icon to see it. Similarly, if a student has syllable deletion or backing, I can't mark that either, depending on the word (e.g., the /t/ in "tire" is greyed out, I wouldn't be able to mark a /k/ for a student who backs alveloars. When I've used my traditional, standardized articulation test, I have made notes for myself on the response sheet with data such as that. Even though that sound isn't being counted for points, it is information I can gather about the student's skills.


From a student's perspective, it may begin to feel awkward when the SLP is tapping away marking all of these things. The ease of hiding your marks behind the stimulus easel is gone, and the student will be able to see green squares turning red or yellow, or to red slash marks. If you have a student who may be sensitive to that, you may just want to use the record button while the student is present, fly through the pictures, and mark the errors after the student has left.

The speech sample includes a lot of things within the scene, and several scenes are available. I recommend turning off the background sounds, because if your student is quiet, or has some subtle errors, it may be difficult to hear him or her.

Feedback rating 4/4
For this rating, I considered whether the app provides specific feedback to the user.

The feedback this app gives you is up to you. If you marked it, it will be visible in a scrolling list of words tested. The app also lets you view errors you marked by sounds, substitutions, and phonological processes. It gives a report that you can use as part of a more comprehensive report, or as a standalone report. It also provides recommendations. But don't forget to use your clinical judgment! The app can only take you so far. You need to ensure that the information which is generated is an accurate description of the student being assessed.


I think the ease of obtaining an intelligibility rating is awesome! You can playback the spontaneous sample and use the + and - buttons to indicate if the student was intelligible or not. When the sample is over, you have a percentage!


Sharing rating 4/4
For this rating, I considered whether the app can collect and save data, and if it can be exported.

The Articulation Test Center app allows you to print or email, provided you have those abilities from your tablet. I do not have a printer I can use from my iPad mini, but emailing would work. It also saves in the app, so you can review it again later, or edit it if there are any errors or things you forgot. The scores are always available from the home screen in the bottom corner.

Overview:
Relevance rating 4/4
Customization rating 4/4
Usability rating 3/4
Feedback rating 4/4
Sharing rating 4/4
Overall: 19/20 (95%)

If you think this app is just what you need, (which it just might be) it can be yours for $49.99. BUT WAIT! Little Bee Speech is throwing a back to school sale! From August 12-14, 2014, it will be 30% off. This will be the biggest sale of the year, so check it out now!


What do you think? Have you used technology when assessing articulation? If not, did this review help you get a feel for what it would be like? Leave a comment below to share your thoughts.
Thanks for checking out my blog. Be sure to follow this blog to stay in touch.

Keep it AFV!
Karen

Monday, August 11, 2014

Hi, dear readers! I have been absent from my blog for far too long. Last year was just a "go-go-go" kind of year, and to top it off, my husband's job relocated him this summer. SO... I've been a little preoccupied with moving, too.

I'm back for my first post of the school year (my district starts up again later this week) with something that I hope will be a great resource for you. I have seen many lists of life hacks to make everyday life simpler. I have brainstormed some that will be particularly useful for those of us who are SLPs! So, I'm throwing my very first linky party! This also serves as my belated bloggy birthday. I'm celebrating 2 years!












1. Test Scores at the Click of a Button
I think this one is the most useful, and therefore it should be first! We've all been there. You administer a test and take it home to score it and you've forgotten the manual! I have seen pleas on a variety of forums with one SLP asking for scores for a particular student's test. Well, worry no more! Scan the test manual's pages that detail the scoring info you need, and save it to your email. Later, when you need the score, just log in, and there it is! My school's copier has an option to scan and email the file to me, maybe yours does, too! (Image from this link.)


2. Finding the End of the Duct Tape

Duct tape is so fashionable these days. It's good for all sorts of crafty projects. But peeling the end to be able to get that first (or next) piece can be a bit irritating. Simply put a paperclip on the sticky side when you're done, and the next time, you can get started sooner! This would also work for the thinner washi tape, too. (Image/concept from this link.)






3. DIY bookmarks

I find myself using sticky notes or sticky flags for bookmarks in various places, only to have them lose their stickiness. I came across this idea and it is great! Make a duct-tape flag at the end of a paperclip and you've got yourself a bookmark. I often write student first names on bookmarks to mark where we left off on a book (such as a reading basal or other larger book). Even works well for materials books like the EET manual or to mark the page I'll need in that big ol' articulation book that I'm sure we all have. (Image/concept from this link.)

4. Phone Stand

I often use my phone to tape or record parts of evaluation sessions. I have a kickstand case on my phone, but in case you don't, you could use an old cassette case as a stand. Find one in your old stash of tapes, or from someone "old" (from the 80s, haha) who may have some old tape cases and would be willing to give you one. (Image/concept from this link.)

So what are your SLP life hacks? Link up here! Be sure to link to this blog and include the image from the top of this blog.

Thanks for checking out my blog! Be sure to follow this blog to stay in touch. Comment below with your favorite SLP life hack, and link up your own if you have a blog.

Keep it AFV!
Karen


Monday, August 11, 2014 Karen
Hi, dear readers! I have been absent from my blog for far too long. Last year was just a "go-go-go" kind of year, and to top it off, my husband's job relocated him this summer. SO... I've been a little preoccupied with moving, too.

I'm back for my first post of the school year (my district starts up again later this week) with something that I hope will be a great resource for you. I have seen many lists of life hacks to make everyday life simpler. I have brainstormed some that will be particularly useful for those of us who are SLPs! So, I'm throwing my very first linky party! This also serves as my belated bloggy birthday. I'm celebrating 2 years!












1. Test Scores at the Click of a Button
I think this one is the most useful, and therefore it should be first! We've all been there. You administer a test and take it home to score it and you've forgotten the manual! I have seen pleas on a variety of forums with one SLP asking for scores for a particular student's test. Well, worry no more! Scan the test manual's pages that detail the scoring info you need, and save it to your email. Later, when you need the score, just log in, and there it is! My school's copier has an option to scan and email the file to me, maybe yours does, too! (Image from this link.)


2. Finding the End of the Duct Tape

Duct tape is so fashionable these days. It's good for all sorts of crafty projects. But peeling the end to be able to get that first (or next) piece can be a bit irritating. Simply put a paperclip on the sticky side when you're done, and the next time, you can get started sooner! This would also work for the thinner washi tape, too. (Image/concept from this link.)






3. DIY bookmarks

I find myself using sticky notes or sticky flags for bookmarks in various places, only to have them lose their stickiness. I came across this idea and it is great! Make a duct-tape flag at the end of a paperclip and you've got yourself a bookmark. I often write student first names on bookmarks to mark where we left off on a book (such as a reading basal or other larger book). Even works well for materials books like the EET manual or to mark the page I'll need in that big ol' articulation book that I'm sure we all have. (Image/concept from this link.)

4. Phone Stand

I often use my phone to tape or record parts of evaluation sessions. I have a kickstand case on my phone, but in case you don't, you could use an old cassette case as a stand. Find one in your old stash of tapes, or from someone "old" (from the 80s, haha) who may have some old tape cases and would be willing to give you one. (Image/concept from this link.)

So what are your SLP life hacks? Link up here! Be sure to link to this blog and include the image from the top of this blog.

Thanks for checking out my blog! Be sure to follow this blog to stay in touch. Comment below with your favorite SLP life hack, and link up your own if you have a blog.

Keep it AFV!
Karen


Saturday, March 22, 2014

Hi!
As I look out the back door today, I can still see the last little remains from the more than 75 inches of snow that was present in my back yard over the course of winter. The once tall and towering mounds of snow on either side of my driveway are but mere little plops of snowy-looking ice. Winter is giving way (though, not without a fight) slowly to spring, and all the snow melt has left my yard a bit squishy.

The hope of Spring and anticipation of Spring break made me think that I needed to finalize my Summer activity calendars. I know, you're thinking, "Summer?! I just need to get through 3rd quarter IEP updates!" or "I have so many referrals and evaluations to get through!" I'm right there with ya. Which is why I want to be sure to get this out there now so it doesn't get put on the back burner and forgotten.



I actually created all new activities from scratch rather than recycling previous calendars' activities. I will eventually re-use those older calendars again, but I like things to feel fresh for my students, so rotating my calendars seems to do the trick. That way, they aren't just doing the "same old, same old" each summer.

There are two versions of my calendars: English and Spanish! If your caseload is similar to mine, you may have quite a few bilingual students that would benefit from having summer activities in Spanish.

Anyway, I thought some of you might like to use them as well, so below here to get your freebies!
2014 Speech-Language Summer Activity Calendars - English
2014 Speech-Language Summer Activity Calendars - Spanish

Also available through the link on Speechie Freebies on the Friday FreeBEES link-up! Check over there for other awesome freebies :-)
http://www.speechiefreebies.com/2014/03/friday-freebees-late-but-still-great.html


Do you provide summer activities for your students? If so, comment below with ideas that you have done in the past. Sharing ideas is great :-)

Thanks for checking out my blog! Be sure to subscribe to keep in touch.
Keep it AFV!
Saturday, March 22, 2014 Karen
Hi!
As I look out the back door today, I can still see the last little remains from the more than 75 inches of snow that was present in my back yard over the course of winter. The once tall and towering mounds of snow on either side of my driveway are but mere little plops of snowy-looking ice. Winter is giving way (though, not without a fight) slowly to spring, and all the snow melt has left my yard a bit squishy.

The hope of Spring and anticipation of Spring break made me think that I needed to finalize my Summer activity calendars. I know, you're thinking, "Summer?! I just need to get through 3rd quarter IEP updates!" or "I have so many referrals and evaluations to get through!" I'm right there with ya. Which is why I want to be sure to get this out there now so it doesn't get put on the back burner and forgotten.



I actually created all new activities from scratch rather than recycling previous calendars' activities. I will eventually re-use those older calendars again, but I like things to feel fresh for my students, so rotating my calendars seems to do the trick. That way, they aren't just doing the "same old, same old" each summer.

There are two versions of my calendars: English and Spanish! If your caseload is similar to mine, you may have quite a few bilingual students that would benefit from having summer activities in Spanish.

Anyway, I thought some of you might like to use them as well, so below here to get your freebies!
2014 Speech-Language Summer Activity Calendars - English
2014 Speech-Language Summer Activity Calendars - Spanish

Also available through the link on Speechie Freebies on the Friday FreeBEES link-up! Check over there for other awesome freebies :-)
http://www.speechiefreebies.com/2014/03/friday-freebees-late-but-still-great.html


Do you provide summer activities for your students? If so, comment below with ideas that you have done in the past. Sharing ideas is great :-)

Thanks for checking out my blog! Be sure to subscribe to keep in touch.
Keep it AFV!

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Hi!

I'm here with another freebie for you today. Recently, my school district has been talking about the Danielson Framework for Teaching as it pertains to teacher evaluations. If you have also been hearing about this particular teacher evaluation tool, keep reading!


I've put together an evaluation planner to collect my thoughts for a future evaluation, keeping these components in mind. My school district has not adopted the Danielson framework at this point, but our evaluation rubric is pretty similar. This organizer is created based on the Danielson Framework for teaching, which I should note, was not created by me. I simply put it into a form that I intend to use to collect my evidence and thoughts.

You can utilize this resource to help you plan for your future evaluations. It is a simple organizer in which you can gather evidence of effective teaching practices in each of the four domains.


Simply write a note or other indicator describing your evidence. You may want to tuck any physical artifacts (pictures, print-outs, etc.) that you have behind each domain so that it is handy.

I hope this will be of help to you!
Click here to get your freebie!
Share this link with your colleagues... because best of all, it's free!

Thanks for checking out my blog. Be sure to follow this blog to keep in touch.
Keep it AFV!
Karen
Thursday, March 20, 2014 Karen
Hi!

I'm here with another freebie for you today. Recently, my school district has been talking about the Danielson Framework for Teaching as it pertains to teacher evaluations. If you have also been hearing about this particular teacher evaluation tool, keep reading!


I've put together an evaluation planner to collect my thoughts for a future evaluation, keeping these components in mind. My school district has not adopted the Danielson framework at this point, but our evaluation rubric is pretty similar. This organizer is created based on the Danielson Framework for teaching, which I should note, was not created by me. I simply put it into a form that I intend to use to collect my evidence and thoughts.

You can utilize this resource to help you plan for your future evaluations. It is a simple organizer in which you can gather evidence of effective teaching practices in each of the four domains.


Simply write a note or other indicator describing your evidence. You may want to tuck any physical artifacts (pictures, print-outs, etc.) that you have behind each domain so that it is handy.

I hope this will be of help to you!
Click here to get your freebie!
Share this link with your colleagues... because best of all, it's free!

Thanks for checking out my blog. Be sure to follow this blog to keep in touch.
Keep it AFV!
Karen

Saturday, March 1, 2014

Hi, there!

In a previous post, I mentioned that I had just gotten myself a set of Rory's Story Cubes.

If you're not familiar with them, the basic idea is that you roll the 9 dice, and connect them all in some way to tell a story. You don't have to use them in a certain order, just what makes sense to you in your story. Additionally, some of the cubes are a little unclear as to what they should be... make it whatever is useful! An example is the last cube in my picture below... the letter L in a square. I don't know what that's supposed to be, so I just chose an L word.

Since I bought my set, I have found quite a bit on other internet sites and blogs about them! I especially have enjoyed finding the graphic organizers that utilize these dice. And... I have an organizer to share with you now as well!

This organizer came from the idea that several teachers at my school shared during a meeting after school. They were sharing that students could tell a story with the framework of "Somebody wanted, so, but, then," which hits at the 5 elements of a story: character, setting, plot, conflict, and resolution. They filled in the story plot with Little Red Riding Hood as an example, and that sold it for me. I knew I could easily use the framework with my students. However, the scrap of paper I wrote it down on got lost in the shuffle, and I hadn't thought much about it until I got my story cubes, and had found other people's graphic organizers. So I decided to make the framework into a graphic organizer so I (and all of you, too) would actually be able use it with some regularity. I added the "finally" to accommodate the 9 dice in the set.

So, I tested out my graphic organizer at home. I rolled my 9 story cubes and this is what I got.


The story could go something like this:

{Dice 1} Sam woke up from a nap one morning
{Dice 2) and realized he wanted to check his math homework to make sure it was correct.
{Dice 3} So he looked in the book to see if there was
{Dice 4} an answer key.
{Dice 5} But just as he was checking the first one, ninjas parachuted out of the sky
{Dice 6} from all over the world.
{Dice 7} Then they said they were looking for
{Dice 8} justice. They came running towards Sam!
{Dice 9} Finally, Sam leapt out of the way to safety and was able to finish his homework.

OK, so obviously, I'm not going to win any literary prizes, but you get the gist. I have a few students on my caseload who I have found to tell narratives that don't go anywhere. They sort of just repeat the first thing they said  and flounder around until it feels like it has been long enough of a story. I have gotten them to retell 2-picture sequence stories, and have been working on them telling their own, and now we're working on 3-4 picture sequences. When they're ready to make the jump to longer stories, I'll have this ready to go!

And now, as is my M.O... some speechy things you can do with these cubes!

Articulation: GREAT for carryover of speech sounds. No matter what sound your student is working on, it's going to come up in the story.
Language: Expanding the length of stories and using more complex syntax is a natural fit. After more simplistic stories (first, next, last), students can begin using some transition words to keep the flow of the story going. Also great for regular/irregular past verb tenses, since many stories are told in the past tense.
Auditory processing: Have a peer listen for details and ask wh- questions about the story that another student told. Examples from my story: "What did Sam need to do?" "Who parachuted down from the sky?" "Where was Sam going to look for answers to math problems?"
Stuttering: Using fluency skills, tell the story. You can start at the 1-sentence level and discuss ways to move through repetitions/blocks/prolongations, and do one dice at a time. If the student is able to produce longer amounts of speech, you can chunk it any way you need to.

CCSS alignment suggestions (not exhaustive):
L.K.1, L.1.1, L.2.1, L.3.1, L.4.1, L.5.1
SL.K.4, SL.K.6, SL.1.4, SL.1.6, SL.2.4, SL.2.6, SL.3.4, SL.3.6, SL.4.4

So, without further ado, click here to grab your FREEBIE!
How do you use picture dice with your students? Comment below and share your ideas.

Thanks for checking out my blog! Be sure to follow this blog to keep in touch.

Keep it AFV!
Karen
Saturday, March 01, 2014 Karen
Hi, there!

In a previous post, I mentioned that I had just gotten myself a set of Rory's Story Cubes.

If you're not familiar with them, the basic idea is that you roll the 9 dice, and connect them all in some way to tell a story. You don't have to use them in a certain order, just what makes sense to you in your story. Additionally, some of the cubes are a little unclear as to what they should be... make it whatever is useful! An example is the last cube in my picture below... the letter L in a square. I don't know what that's supposed to be, so I just chose an L word.

Since I bought my set, I have found quite a bit on other internet sites and blogs about them! I especially have enjoyed finding the graphic organizers that utilize these dice. And... I have an organizer to share with you now as well!

This organizer came from the idea that several teachers at my school shared during a meeting after school. They were sharing that students could tell a story with the framework of "Somebody wanted, so, but, then," which hits at the 5 elements of a story: character, setting, plot, conflict, and resolution. They filled in the story plot with Little Red Riding Hood as an example, and that sold it for me. I knew I could easily use the framework with my students. However, the scrap of paper I wrote it down on got lost in the shuffle, and I hadn't thought much about it until I got my story cubes, and had found other people's graphic organizers. So I decided to make the framework into a graphic organizer so I (and all of you, too) would actually be able use it with some regularity. I added the "finally" to accommodate the 9 dice in the set.

So, I tested out my graphic organizer at home. I rolled my 9 story cubes and this is what I got.


The story could go something like this:

{Dice 1} Sam woke up from a nap one morning
{Dice 2) and realized he wanted to check his math homework to make sure it was correct.
{Dice 3} So he looked in the book to see if there was
{Dice 4} an answer key.
{Dice 5} But just as he was checking the first one, ninjas parachuted out of the sky
{Dice 6} from all over the world.
{Dice 7} Then they said they were looking for
{Dice 8} justice. They came running towards Sam!
{Dice 9} Finally, Sam leapt out of the way to safety and was able to finish his homework.

OK, so obviously, I'm not going to win any literary prizes, but you get the gist. I have a few students on my caseload who I have found to tell narratives that don't go anywhere. They sort of just repeat the first thing they said  and flounder around until it feels like it has been long enough of a story. I have gotten them to retell 2-picture sequence stories, and have been working on them telling their own, and now we're working on 3-4 picture sequences. When they're ready to make the jump to longer stories, I'll have this ready to go!

And now, as is my M.O... some speechy things you can do with these cubes!

Articulation: GREAT for carryover of speech sounds. No matter what sound your student is working on, it's going to come up in the story.
Language: Expanding the length of stories and using more complex syntax is a natural fit. After more simplistic stories (first, next, last), students can begin using some transition words to keep the flow of the story going. Also great for regular/irregular past verb tenses, since many stories are told in the past tense.
Auditory processing: Have a peer listen for details and ask wh- questions about the story that another student told. Examples from my story: "What did Sam need to do?" "Who parachuted down from the sky?" "Where was Sam going to look for answers to math problems?"
Stuttering: Using fluency skills, tell the story. You can start at the 1-sentence level and discuss ways to move through repetitions/blocks/prolongations, and do one dice at a time. If the student is able to produce longer amounts of speech, you can chunk it any way you need to.

CCSS alignment suggestions (not exhaustive):
L.K.1, L.1.1, L.2.1, L.3.1, L.4.1, L.5.1
SL.K.4, SL.K.6, SL.1.4, SL.1.6, SL.2.4, SL.2.6, SL.3.4, SL.3.6, SL.4.4

So, without further ado, click here to grab your FREEBIE!
How do you use picture dice with your students? Comment below and share your ideas.

Thanks for checking out my blog! Be sure to follow this blog to keep in touch.

Keep it AFV!
Karen